Ido Portal Method Lizard Crawl Exercises For Beginners

Ido Portal

 

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Progression to the lizard crawl…

 

Arguably, one of the most confusing aspects about the Lizard Crawl, a ground-based locomotion drill brought to fame by Ido Portal, is where the heck is a true beginner supposed to start?  

To be clear, when I say “true beginner”, I am not talking about a person previously a competitive gymnast, high-level athlete or even a person who’s just completed the Gymnastics Bodies 12-week course and moving like a champ.

I’m describing a person who has an average capacity to move (but is motivated to learn) and interested in learning more about these fantastic drills.  Or, maybe a “true beginner” is a person who’s looking to re-establish a workout regimen and hasn’t moved purposefully in a great while.  

Either way, I applaud you for stopping by and learning how to crawl like a lizard.

The goal of this article is to provide several launching points to use as a gradual work up into the full Lizard Crawl.  Each successive Lizard Crawl progression is purposed to provide a gentle introduction to the body position and loading, in order to prevent overwhelming the body (and the mind) with the complexity of the full Lizard Crawl.  

A full-blown Lizard Crawl has a deceptive number of parts moving simultaneously and requires a combination of mental processing and physical capability.  There’s an incredible amount of mind-body connection needed to crawl in this position.  So, rather than rushing into the sexy dynamic variations, tripping over yourself or becoming frustrated, start by breaking up the movement into sections and training each section exclusively.

Personally, I believe it’s best to start by practicing static exercises first.  By training in one place, you’re removing some of the heavy thinking on how to move next in the Lizard Crawl, which believe it or not, is half the battle.  First experiences in this low position can leave a person wondering how they’re supposed to move an inch, much less 15-20 yards.

If you’re addicted to motion, static training can be a boring rinse and repeat activity, but it’s important to pound on the basics before moving on.  Give each of these exercises a shot, even if you think you’re beyond the progression.

[All of the exercise progressions listed below assume you’re able to do 15-20+ traditional body weight push-ups without issue.  If not, certainly continue to read on, but hammer away on upper body resistance training first to establish a base of strength.  

Ido often refers to traditional resistance training as “isolation training”.

 

Lizard Crawl Progression #1:  Push-Up with Alternating Foot Placement

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The goal of this first drill is to practice the feel of the lizard crawl while reducing the amount of strength needed to do so.  Using two arms into the descent accomplishes this.  

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Video embed coming soon… click the icon or here

  1.  Step the foot up to the outside of hand and plant.
  2.  Lower down into and out of a push-up.  
  3.  Return to high plank position.

Sets/Reps:  3-4 sets of 6-10 per side

When to progress:  If you’re technically sound with 10 reps per side, move on to progression #3.  

*** Using a pair of carpet slides will assist this simple exercise. Carpet slides are a valuable training tool.  Besides being useful for a wide range of bodyweight exercises (and resistance training), carpet slides help to provide a fundamental understanding of ground-based crawling technique, with relatively low-friction.

Lizard Crawl Progression #2:  Carpet Slide Upper-Body Reach and Press

Carpet Slide Reach and Press

The lizard crawl requires respectable upper body strength.  Lifting the arms with grace, placing them softly on the floor in a low crawl position is an uncommon pattern of movement.  It requires strength through a fuller range of motion.  The strength needed for lizard crawling is very different from the strength needed during an isolation exercise like a push-up.  Push-ups will help you will lizard crawling, but only to point.  

Anticipate the arms feeling heavy in the low crawl position. 

The premise of this next drill is to introduce load the working arm while practicing the arc range of motion using the carpet slide.  Over time, decrease hand pressure on the carpet slide, eventually removing the slide completely.

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Video embed coming soon, but for now, click the icon or here

Sets/Reps:  3-4 sets of 5-8 per arm.

When to progress:  If you’re technically sound with 8 repetitions, move on to progression #3.

Progression of this exercise:  Tempo changes everything.  Slow down the descent to the floor and also the arm moving through the arc.

 

Lizard Crawl Progression #3:  Alternating Lower-Body Step and Reach

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Step, lower down, reach and breathe…

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Video embed coming soon, but for now, click on the icon or here

  1. Starting in a high plank position, step one foot to the outside of the same side hand.  (The side you step to will be opposite of the working arm)
  2. Slowly lower your chest to 1-2 inches above the floor.
  3. With soft pressure, slide the unloaded hand out into full extension. 
  4. Pause for a moment, breathe, feel the position.
  5. Slide the hand back in, return the foot and press up to the high plank.  
  6. That’s one repetition.

Sets/Reps:  3-4 sets of 8-10 reps on each side. 

When to progress:  If you’re technically sound with 10 repetitions on each side, move on to dynamic crawling variations (video).

Progressions for this exercise:  Slow the tempo, add weight to the exercise in the form of a light weight vest or body conforming sand bag or progression to dynamic bear crawling (video).

Bringing it home…

***  One of the best cues in movement training is to move quietly.  Less noise through a robust range of motion implies full control over the movement.  

One last important training tip: all of these drills can be performed with stretch band assistance.  Stretch band assistance allows reduces body weight loading to encourage technique execution.

Some folks have steered away from using stretch bands to assist exercises like chin-ups, pull-ups, push-ups, single leg squats in recent years, but I am a HUGE advocate of using stretch bands for gradual load progression.  Any stretch bands will do, though RubberBanditz bands are spreading like wildfire.  

Give these exercises a shot and be mindful of what’s taking place as you’re inside of the training session.  

The secret sauce to progress is disciplined effort and consistency.  Practice and you will experience results.

Cheers, 

KG

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The Swinging Plank

Quick Tips

The Swinging Plank is a brilliant hybrid exercise designed by Scott Sonnon, founder of TacFit training systems. The movement will put your upper body strength, endurance and multi-planar core strength and stability to the test.

If you’re looking for a non-traditional movement challenge, this is it!  hat will burn out your core and arms, the swinging plank will deliver, even at low rep ranges.

The swinging plank is a tough motion that pays high dividends in a short amount of time.

For the last several months, I have beating on this exercise (and it’s variations) hard.  Even today, I’m still impressed by how much energy it takes to complete mild rep schemes.

Technical bodyweight movements like this will get you functionally strong in a hurry without much bulk, which is great for someone who want’s to function the way they look.

Bodyweight control…

Those of you who’ve been loyal to traditional forms of resistance training will find ground-based bodyweight exercise to be an incredible supplement workouts.

The swinging plank embodies current fitness trends: the shift away from structured exercise and into exploring integrated movement training.

And its not that traditional exercise is bad, it’s not, it has its place and will always have it’s place.  The idea is that at some point, the body and mind crave freedom of movement, beyond what adding more weight, reps, sets can offer us.

Patterns like high and low crawling, narrow surface balancing and hanging exist.

Ground-based exercises that require full bodyweight support (hands and feet in contact on the ground) are fantastic for building functional strength, or in some cases where injury is present, a gentle re-introduction to loading.

By movement design, the swinging plank elicits a minimal amount of stress to the lower body, making it ideal for non-competing circuits or training days where the lower body needs a break from exertion.

However, execution of the exercise will require adequate mobility in the hips, knees and ankles, so if you’re extremely restricted, free up those joints first.  One look at this drill and you can see that lower body joint mobility is a pre-requisite for proper technique.

A fusion of exercises…

Elements of yoga and familiar bodyweight exercise fuse to create the swinging plank.

The static plank, chaturanga, push-up, dive-bomber and crawling all merge to form the swinging plank exercise.

At the midway point of the drill, you’ll find yourself in chaturanga (Four-Limb Staff Pose), one of yoga’s asanas (“postures”).  In chaturanga, the body is gracefully lowered toward to the floor, stopping where the elbows reach 90 degrees and tucked into the ribs, core fully activated.

 

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Chaturanga

 

Pressing back and out of chaturanga feels a lot like a push-up or a dive-bomber.  Dive-bombers are a real shoulder burner when performed strict.  Because the movement is backward and not straight up, it’s hard to relate the stress as being identical to a push-up.

Now, what you came here for…

How to do The Swinging Plank

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1. Start with weight on the balls of your feet (knees and hips flexed into a squat position) hands extended out in front of the shoulders with palms placed firmly on the ground, eyes gazing between the hands or slightly in front of the hands.

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2.  In a front to back motion, lunge your body forward out in between the hands, keeping the elbows against the rib cage, body rigid and low to the ground.

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3.  Rotate the chest and torso over the hands and onto to the opposite side, pressing with the arms and pulling slightly with the legs back into the starting position (#1), now facing the other side.

In full frame, here is TacFit Commando creator Scott Sonnon demonstrating the swing plank…

The starting position of the swing plank looks a lot the start position of a bear crawl, except in the swing plank, the shoulders are situated just behind the hands verses over the top of the hands.

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Start position of a bear crawl.

I’ve found that using this prone table top position (picture above) is a great way to get hand/foot spacing correct.

Technique tips continued…

Technique-wise, it’s important to force the hips into full extension.  Create a straight line from heels to the crown of the head.

Core should stay “soft” yet active to control body position.  Avoid over-tensioning or you’ll be too stiff to flow through the movement.

*** To avoid hand slippage, place the hands on a surface that gives you a good grip. On the way out and back in, you’re not going to be over the top of your hands like you would be during a push-up. Rubber gym matting, grass, a quality yoga mat with some stickiness or a a grittier surface like concrete all work well.

 

Swing Plank exercise progression…

If you’re quite not ready for the swing plank or maybe you’re looking for a soft progression to get there, here are some drills to work through (in order from top to bottom):

  • 1. Static Prone Plank (Hold for 40 seconds or longer)
  • 2. Static Lateral Plank (Hold for 30 seconds or longer each side)
  • 3. Rotational Dynamic Plank Variations (see here)
  • 4. Bodyweight Push-Ups (15-20 reps)
  • 5.  Dive-Bombers (eccentric and concentric phases, 8-10 reps)
  • 6.  Piston Planks
  • 7.  Swinging Planks!

Look, not everyone is going to need all of these exercises.  You might be ready for the swing plank right now.  If that’s the case, great!  But if you’re not, work through 1-7 exercises until your body is acclimated enough.

There’s no need to rush into a sloppy movement patterns for the sake of rushing into sloppy movement patterns. Aim to do it right, or quite honestly, don’t do it at all.

Long-term, dialing in proper technique and learning movement is best practice.

If you’re wobbly in the swinging plank because it’s new, that’s one thing. If you’re wobbly in the swinging plank because you skipped the basics and went straight to the sexy stuff,  that’s another.

You’ll get a phenomenal training effect by hammering away at each of the exercise progressions above will provide a tremendous physical challenge despite. Building the foundation crucial.

 

Fix mobility restrictions…

If you’re lower body lacks ideal joint mobility, address these limitations first.  Fixing mobility restrictions is essential to maintaining joint health, injury prevention, and getting the most out of your workouts.

During the swing plank, your hip, knee and ankle joints should move freely without restriction, aches or pains. The starting position of the swing plank places the ankle, knee and hip joints into a very demanding range of motion.

If you find yourself locked up and struggling to get into position without rounding the lower back, I recommend addressing mobility restrictions first.

Scott Sonnon’s training system is all-encompassing, and extend beyond tactical conditioning.  His mobility and yoga programs are world-class, here are three I recommend…

Six Degree Flow
Progressive Yoga
Primal Stress

Progressive Yoga proved to be a game changer for me, as calming the body, turning the focus inward is extremely rewarding.

A huge mistake people make with exertion intense exercise is failing to remove yourself from it.

Opting for too much “pedal to the metal” high tempo training will rip your body apart in time, you’ve got to slow it down, relax and restore.

Where does the swinging plank fit into a workout/program?

In short, anywhere you want.

Personally, I prefer swinging planks mixed into work capacity focused training sessions, leveraged as a transition exercise.

But the reality is that the options are limitless.

Because of the minimal lower body stress, the swinging plank is a perfect transition exercise between upper (vertical pressing, push-ups, dive-bombers) and lower body exercises (lunges, squats, deadlifts, kettlebell swings).

A sample sequence:

8-10 minutes continuous of:

1a) Bodyweight Lunge x 6 right/left

2a) TacFit Swing Plank x6 right/left

3a) Bodyweight Chin-Up x6

Using a non-competing exercise format provides an opportunity to focus on movement technique. Accumulating fatigue degrades exercise technique quickly, but the active rest from choosing a non-competing exercise order will aid in maintaining technique.

Random Discussion…

Deconstruct and go slow. I suggest you break the swing plank down into segments in order to appreciate the movement.  Practice the swing plank in slow motion for fewer reps. Do it right. Pause when you reach extension (chaturanga-like posture). Connect your mind to each muscle and transition.

Be critical of your hand, foot, torso and head position. Pay attention to your breathing throughout the range of motion. Are you breathing or are you holding your breath? Make sure that your tongue stays relaxed and you’re breathing.

Stay low! You should have a little dirt on your t-shirt when you’re done. Not mopping the floor, but rather the staying low increases the challenge.

Maintaining a rigid posture while turning over from side to side will blow up your mid-section. The rotational core stability challenge is potent as you flow through each rep.

When performed for as a part of a circuit or for higher reps, the swinging plank elicits a potent cardio training effect, making it a great exercise for metabolic workouts.

Hybrid bodyweight training is highly effective and yet so often overlooked. It’s easy to become infatuated with numbers on the bar, fancy equipment and racing the clock.

Having full control over your body in many different positions is the ultimate safeguard against injury and gateway to performance.

Most who consider themselves strong lifters will be humbled by the challenge and the effectiveness of properly executed bodyweight training. Moving into (and out of) body positions that reveal weaknesses in stability and strength can deliver incredible conditioning and improve other lifts.

If you’re interested finding out about more unique bodyweight workouts that incorporate movements like the swinging plank, check out TacFit Commando.

 

 

Cheers,

Kyle